Emerging Slade School artist strikes a discordant note using the fragmented female form.

Showtime and show season is upon us once again, whether you’re just passionate about art or an aspiring collector, a trip to the Slade School of Art is the perfect place to spot emerging artists. For an institution that has launched such feted artists as diverse as Antony Gormley, Mona Hatoum, Martin Creed and Marvin Gaye Chetwynd, it is not surprising that the Slade show presents us with such a rich selection of emerging artists working across a range of different approaches.

 

She rails against the objectification of women in startling pieces using the fragmented female form in a variety of incongruous materials.

 

The material used by Jocelyn McGregor has suppressed qualities, aspects that we are not meant to see. They are facilitators for something else. Gravitating towards states of matter – crystallisation, extrusion, decay. Jocelyn’s sculptural installations investigate the discordance between the basic physical elements of the natural world and the development of synthetic materials, media, and the built and virtual environments that shape our daily lives. To find this perpetual confrontation of the synthetic and the natural we have only to look beyond Western, urban service industries to the rural landscape, and to global sites of production and export.

 

‘I’m on the hunt for the point of transition between internal and external, real and imagined worlds.’

 

This year’s recipient of the Sarabande Fund for Emerging Artists Jocelyn McGregor was shortlisted by the University for interview by the Sarabande panel. These have included Sarabande Patrons Nick Knight OBE, Andrew Bolton and Shaun Leane as well as Sarah Burton OBE, Jake Chapman, Matthew Slotover and Katy England. After graduation scholars are also offered a studio space for 12 months in Sarabande HQ to continue their practise and enable and support their developing relationship with industry professional and are invited to attend educational workshops, drop-in’s and discussions held at the foundation. After graduation scholars are also offered a studio space for 12 months in Sarabande HQ to continue their practise and enable and support their developing relationship with industry professional and are invited to attend educational workshops, drop-in’s and discussions held at the foundation. READ MORE

© Images Jocelyn McGregor